Friday, May 30, 2008

Leaving Meerut - Rajni Radio shop

Almost every day I rode my bike down to a little tiny electronics / radio repair shop called Rajni Radio. While nobody that worked there spoke English fluently, we were always able to communicate - even when it came to tough subjects like electrical engineering. I was able to describe what I had, and what I needed, and they did the rest. It was face-to-face, international, language barrier outsourcing at its best. We shared cups of chai masala (spiced tea) daily, and to me, it was the best 6 foot wide, 3 story tall shop in Meerut.

Mostly these guys repair various types of radios (hence the name) and audio systems, but they went out of their way to help me more than once. When I wanted a part that was not available anywhere here in Meerut, they had it sent over from Delhi the next morning. It was great to hang out and watch the different workers do their tasks -- rebuilding speakers, opening televisions, running out to fetch some tea, etc. The difference between "shops" around the world will not stop surprising me. All so varied, and yet all so ignorant that things could be done any other way. Here's the tour of the firetrap / electrical wonderland that is Rajni Radio:

[[Video Not Uploaded!!]]

(I know, I know, my commentary needs work. I've found when I'm in survival English mode it takes a few days to get back to my normal, vocabulariffic self.)

2 comments:

  1. Cool stuff dude - the radio guys rock - are they the ones who helped you get your bike system going?

    That ice cram cylinder is pretty amazing too - how do they keep that thing from melting in the sweltring Indian heat!?

    Lookin' forward to your vid of the radio shop....

    Laters,

    Rasviper

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  2. Yeah, the helped with making some of the generator to speakers power get going.

    I'll try and repost the video one of these days, it's 24mb, hence it didn't get uploaded I guess.

    Oh, and about the ice cream, they just have the fair at night time, from like 9pm onwards, so then it's only about 95 degrees out... and as I type this I still don't know how they keep it solid.

    -HB

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