Friday, May 31, 2013

Mild introduction to a new chapter of life

Last week I was able to complete the last item on my Los Angeles bucket list - something I'd been meaning to make time for, for the past few years: visit the Getty Villa.  Not to be confused with the main Getty Center, the Getty Villa requires (free) ticket reservations and is located 5 miles north on Highway 1 from Santa Monica.



I learned that heavy Greek and Roman architecture, sculpture, and overall artifacts are not my favorite styles.  That said, I'm glad that Getty took on the project of tying together his modern design approach and incorporating his historical interests; it makes for an interesting experience.  Many more geometric designs than I anticipated, and which I associate more with Arabian design; I loved the inlaid stone floors!



With my Los Angeles bucket list completed for the time being (items can always be added!), I packed a few bags (more than I should have) and walked out my front door, hopped a train, bus, and then a plane.





I embarked a journey that will take me to fjords in both the Northern and Southern hemispheres, tropical beaches, markets of the last thousand years, and more.

Utilizing planes, trains, ferries, automobiles, bicycles, and, of course, my Talaria (shown here) I charge forth!

Much like this little child / kuros, I press onward in my journey of life, trying to interpret the world through the eyes of someone more wise, and learn along the way!



My first stop takes me across the International Date Line to Auckland, NZ, where my host neighborhood offers a wonderfully sporty method of controlling automobile speeds: two-way working chicanes instead of speed bumps/humps.

The photo below is taken looking straight down the street, and note the angle of the van exiting the chicane; clearly a poor execution that focused on the optimal trajectory for the first turn, ignoring the second turn and making impossible a more preferable exit from the obstacle.

Tsk, tsk, van driver.  Slow down earlier, line up optimally for your final turn, and accelerate into the straightaway.

There's also a super-awesome, hand-spinnable kinetic sculpture in town that plays with light and wind nicely:


Nicely polished welds on unpolished, raw stainless steel (?) left the piece with a beautiful raw-yet-refined finish.